MultiChoice in court over illegal football streaming infringement rights by internet providers

People watching football in a club in Nairobi photo
People watching football in a club in Nairobi. FILE

 

The High Court directs two internet providers in Kenya to pull down or maim all websites pirating content from MultiChoice.


Multichoice owns restricted rights to airing sports across the world.

Streaming football fans get a huge blow. They depend on internet channels that transmit football matches illegally.


In her ruling, Justice Wilfrida Okwany issued temporary orders targeting sites claimed to be airing football content without consent from the rights owners.


"Section 35B of the Copyright Act obligates an Internet service provider to take down any infringing content within 48 hours of being served with a takedown notice," the plaintiff argued.


The respondents, the two internet providers, explained that they do not have any of claimed pirated sites.

They through the problem to the Communication Authority of Kenya (CA) saying its the board that regulates the sites and content they air in Kenya.


The base of the case was on the Copyright (Amendment) Act 2019 that houses the new laws on copyright infringement in Internet Service Providers (ISPs).

According to Section 35B of the Act,  a person whose rights have been infringed by content to which access is being offered by an Internet service provider may request, by way of a takedown notice which ends the infringment.


The next mentioning will be on March 3, 2021, with football enthusiasts keen to know their fate.

 

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